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May 12, 2022

Jack Hibbs Interviews Sherriff Chad Bianco

Guest Sherriff Chad Bianco - Pastor Jack interviews Sherriff Chad Bianco, a law enforcement officer who took a strong public stance against enforcing nonsensical orders during COVID lockdowns. Jack and Chad discuss topics such as social agendas, people’s rights, AB 2223, abortion, the role of law enforcement, and being a force for good in the local community.


Pastor Jack interviews Sherriff Chad Bianco, a law enforcement officer who took a strong public stance against enforcing nonsensical orders during COVID lockdowns. Jack and Chad discuss topics such as social agendas, people’s rights, AB 2223, abortion, the role of law enforcement, and being a force for good in the local community.

Learn more and get all the notes on this podcast by visiting https://jackhibbs.com/podcast - sign up for our mailing list and get the latest podcast information and updates!

 

 

Transcript

Speaker 1:
Hey, listen, what do you get when you get, uh, law in order and a passion for life, you get sheriff, Chad Bianco, and he's gonna be sitting down with us on this special podcast. He is the beloved sheriff of Riverside county. He's making waves across the state and across the nation. I think you're gonna have an amazing time and an enlightening moment. Don't forget that you can always subscribe to the jacks podcast by hitting subscribe, wherever you listen to your podcast. So gesture your pods, turn up the volume and get ready. Let's roll 

Speaker 2:
Real life presents the Jack Hibbs podcast with intention and boldness to proclaim truth, equip the saints and impact our culture. You can get the outlines of this podcast by going to Jack hibbs.com/podcast. Today. If this podcast lifts you up and encourages you to live a more fulfilled life in Christ, then make sure you leave us one of those five star ratings to us. That's like saying amen, or yes, then that rating will encourage others to listen. Now, open your hearts to what God's word has to say to you. 

Speaker 1:
So sheriff, Chad Bianco, Riverside county, uh, I can't believe I'm sitting here at the table with you. Not because I'm some sort of a lawbreaker, but because remarkably the times and the days in which you and I live in have brought us to the same microphone right now. 

Speaker 3:
Yes 

Speaker 1:
They have. And so tell us a little bit about, um, who you are, how'd you get to where you're at. And, um, if you don't mind boasting a little bit, uh, you are now one of America's most beloved sheriffs. 

Speaker 3:
I, I certainly am told that a lot. I, I wouldn't say I agree with it, but is enough people tell me that I, I do have to, I do have to acknowledge that that that's the case. You have to be careful 

Speaker 1:
<laugh> you have to be careful, but why do you think that's the case? There's certain things that have happened that have put you forward. Why, why and what are those things? 

Speaker 3:
Well, absolutely. Uh, being the sheriff of Riverside county, we're, we're a huge county. We're the second largest in California, fourth in the country. So it's, it's a, it's a large department, a large presence, uh, during the, during the COVID crisis and the situation that we were dealing with and particularly the lockdown orders and the, the church closures and the business closures and the arrest people, if they come outta their house, those types of things, um, combined with a time while simultaneously the governor was releasing tens of thousands of inmates, right? For no reason. So they're all going back into our communities while they want us to arrest people coming outta their house or not wearing masks or people going to church pastors opening that their, their churches want, they want them arrested. And I took a stand to it. I, I said it was ridiculous. 

Speaker 3:
I, and on multiple fronts, not only about the, the constitutional part of it, but Al also just the, the common sense, right. Part of it. And I couldn't justify arresting a single mom that was trying to put food on the table and knowing that these, these, that serious felons were just being released into our streets and it didn't make sense. And so I took a public stance. It was, uh, at two of our, over the course of a couple of months of board meetings and those VI, those are televised and videoed and everything else. And they went, they went viral of me saying that yes, they did. And, um, you know, I, I think the reason why numerous media outlets asked me why, and I don't think I'm any better than anybody else. I think that I was thinking what everyone else was thinking. It's just the regular day to day person doesn't have a platform. 

Speaker 3:
And I had that platform being, being the sheriff of, of a large organization and being in front of, of the board like that in a, in a, in a position of, of law law and order. Right. And taking that stand, I think all I really did is say what everyone else was thinking. And they all jumped right behind me. And then it was, I was just standing with them and we were all saying the same thing. And I think that's why it became so popular and why it took off so much. And then because no one was doing it at the time, that was very early on in the, in the situation that we're dealing with. Right. Uh, I think I just became a, one of the first that, that were standing against what was happening. And so it, uh, it, it took off more than, than what normally would've, I think 

Speaker 1:
It took off more than normally that it would have. I understand that. But what you did was you took a stand because you knew what was right. And you were willing to, uh, take the hits from those who didn't think it was right. For whatever reasons, but you inspired people, courage. We've all learned, especially, you know, you, I love reading about Washington, George Washington's, um, presence and battle and how he could take even a farm, just a, a farmer with a, with a musket and transform that person into a, an individual of courage because Washington was willing not to fight the battle from the back, but Washington would go out in the front and you went out into the front. And by doing that, you inspired not only those that are residing in your county, you clearly went beyond that and you inspired other sheriffs. 

Speaker 1:
You inspired so many law enforcement. You and I had not met at that time, but your reputation literally preceded you because here at the, the church that I pastor, there's such a large presence of law enforcement, and your name was just a buzz and it was awesome to hear and to see. And, um, others took a stand as well, which is remarkable because in some little way, I think it'd be good for our listeners to, to kind of process this through. So as a pastor, I was told by other pastors, you can't open your church because you have to obey the law. And Romans 13 says, you've gotta obey the governing powers, Jack. So you're going against the law by opening your church. And it caused me to go back and read Romans 13 again. And it talks about, uh, made putting in a modern day vernacular. 

Speaker 1:
It talks about the police officer and, and the system that is to ensure our safety, uh, that, that they are to put down evil. They are to crush evil. They P they are to punish evil. And I'm a big fan of punishing evil, but I was being told Jack you're evil by opening your church. And then I read in Romans 13 that the officer does not bear his bear, his sword in vain, but is used as an instrument of God to do good. And that was the turning point for me. Wait, there are people in power, not all of them have good in interest in their, in their repertoire of, of politics. So to speak, you stood for what was good. It may not have been popular at the moment, but it turned out to be heroic in the end and your, your courage was, was contagious. And I found my comfort, knowing that, Hey, you know what, I'm opening up Jesus' church, cuz it belongs to him and we're all about doing good. And um, it was quite remarkable. So now that we've established that, can I ask you real quick before we dive into the weeds here? Absolutely. Um, how long have you been sheriff and is it, is it inappropriate for me to ask you? Would you run again? 

Speaker 3:
No, it's not. Um, I've been the sheriff for the election was four years ago. Uh, technically I've I, I was sworn in, in January of 2019, so it's been three and a half years. Uh, I've been with the Sheriff's department coming up on 29 years and that's the only agency that I've worked for. Uh, so three and a half of that is the sheriff. Uh, my term ends next January. Uh, the election, however though is in June mm-hmm <affirmative> so the primary election is in June, but the way it works, a nonpartisan race, as long as somebody gets 50% plus one vote, uh, then it ends, it doesn't go to November. So my race will end in, uh, June on June 7th. Yeah, 

Speaker 1:
June 7th of, 

Speaker 3:
Of this year. And I'm fairly confident, confident that, uh, that I'm going to win. I, I think everyone's fairly comp confident I'm gonna win. And then I, I have no, I have no intention of leaving. My brain still thinks I'm I'm very, very young <laugh> so as long as I can, I 

Speaker 1:
Thought that was my delusion. 

Speaker 3:
Yeah. As long as I can keep my body that way, uh, I'll I'll stay here as long as voters wants. Want me here? 

Speaker 1:
Well, that just made a lot of people. Very, very happy. Anything we can do to help you, by the way, in that, please don't hesitate to let us know. So let's dive in. Um, uh, I was up in Sacramento a couple weeks ago in defense of, uh, uh, people, citizens, a lot of people. In fact, according to the Sergeant of arms at the Capitol, we had a, a crowd of over 3000 people gather, uh, to ask our legislators to stop or to defeat or to pull the AB assembly bill AB 2223. And um, that Sergeant of Armstead, it's the largest crowd that he had seen in 25 years at the state capital, which means people care. Uh, this is something that, to me, it's, it's hard for me to believe that we're talking about this when I share with people what the bill is. Um, most people say, I, I don't believe you mm-hmm <affirmative> and um, I just got a briefing last week, um, on Sunday, uh, from a deputy district attorney, uh, wanting me to make sure Jack, do you have you read the bill? 

Speaker 1:
Do you understand what it says? Do you understand what it says and how it affects, uh, law enforcement, how it affects investigations that if this passes and for those of, for those who listening right now, they don't know what this Bill's about. That if a child is born under what the term is, perinatal death mm-hmm <affirmative>, which is a death that the child suffers by whatever means we don't know. And we won't be able to find out there's no investigation. The Coron will be required to simply state to the best of his or her ability. The time of death was thus. And so of date or time that this child basically evaporates into thin air upon the child's death by whatever means, um, it's my hope that law enforcement up and down the state gather together and form some form of organic union or, or statement that this cannot, that this cannot, uh, pass, but it ties your hands. And not only that, but it's my understanding from this da that it could even open you up for investigation or prosecution because you chose to ask questions about this, correct? Can you talk to us about it? Because people think I'm the only crazy person 

Speaker 3:
And it's unfortunate. I want to go back to what you said about having the largest crowd there for this and the, the Sergeant at arms telling you that that's the largest crowd they've had there. Why do we not know about that? Why did I didn't see it on TV? You're right. It wasn't covered by the news media that this was going on. And so people don't believe you because they've never heard about it. Why haven't they heard about it? Right? It's, it's, it's very scary that this is happening. And when you, when you talk about law enforcement and you say that you're hoping that we, we do that. So do I, uh, I hope that we're, we're starting to be which we are. We're being very much more vocal in our communications with our legislatures because we've been taken advantage of for years. And I, I say this all the time for the, the majority of people are, are great people. 

Speaker 3:
We're, we're good people. We care about each other people. Of course, we care about our families. We care about our neighbors. We care about suffering. We care, we care. We have hearts that's we care. Um, that's how we were born and a very, very small percentage do not. Um, those are criminals. I like to say there's 5% of the population and that's made up of criminals and politicians. Uh, but we all care and we all want what is best. So in our world, how we deal with, with politics and the, and the legislature is very gentleman. We're very, we're not rude. We're very polite. We send them nice letters. Please take in, take our thoughts and are concerned into consideration. There's no teeth behind that. There's no, they don't. We don't even think they read them. Um, I don't even think they care. And we've gotten to this point now because of our silence and because of our playing nice and playing by the rules and that side never does. 

Speaker 3:
That's right. And it's interesting that you had the largest crowd there ever in history, and no one knows about it, but yet 10, 15, 20 people go there for something that fits their agenda. That's right. And it's all, it's all over every news media and they, they nice little camera angles to make it look like it's a lot of people. Exactly correct. But something like this, the murder of a baby, the potential murder of a baby, and there is no media uproar about this. There is no, the, our, our Hollywood elite isn't up in arms about babies being murdered, potentially being murdered. Isn't it something. And it's, I, I hope, I hope you're exactly right. That, that all law enforcement stands together on this and loudly opposes it because the wording of it is very, very scary and words meet things, especially written by lawyers, for legislation. 

Speaker 3:
That's right. And they know exactly how they wrote it, why they wrote it. That's right. The word they used. It's interesting that you say the, the perinatal there's a different statue in California. And I can't remember what it is, but it was, it was meant for something else. And it, it names, or it numbers the perinatal at 28 days. That's correct. However, perinatal could be up to one year old. Yes. And so do they, did they even know that? I don't think they're smart enough to know that that was in that 28 days was in there. I think they used perinatal because hoping that nobody else knew what it meant. Yep. And that they could use that one year. So we were, we're at least bound by the state law. That's currently on the books that, that limits it at 28 days. But within that 28 days, anything can happen. 

Speaker 3:
Yeah. And if it, they, they claim the people that are talking for this bill, wanting it to pass. They're unbelievably good liars. They, they lie without actually lying. Um, they just leave things out and they, they manipulate fact's and they, they, they play on emotion to make you feel in the blanks wrongly mm-hmm <affirmative>. So you're, you're because of how they led you down that path. Mm-hmm, <affirmative>, you're assuming things differently than what they really mean. And that's how they get that's how they get it passed. So that, that perinatal 28 days, if they didn't want it in there, they could have taken it out. They've said, oh, no, that's not what we mean. It's about, you know, the, the, the woman's right. And the abortion. And they use these two women as the, the perfect examples of how flawed the system is because two women were prosecuted and how wrongly it was done. They left out the fact that they killed their babies by drug overdosing them. 

Speaker 1:
That's right. 

Speaker 3:
And they just want you to think, and 

Speaker 1:
There's loss on the books to defend that child in that situation. 

Speaker 3:
Absolutely. So in that case, if they wanted to fix this bill originally, they could have taken perinatal perinatal out of there and just specifically said what they wanted. 

Speaker 1:
Exactly. I, you said that so well, and so clear. And when it went into, uh, public testimony, which means, uh, as I'm sitting as one of the expert witnesses, and there's a physician next to me, as one of the expert witnesses, when we were done making our case before the state assembly, then they opened it up for public comment and the line, it was like you said, historic, it was truly amazing. But, uh, to show you how the narrative, uh, has got to be controlled either by extreme detail or in the authorship of the bill, uh, lack of detail for a reason that when people were coming up and saying, I urge you to vote against this bill, I'm gonna be watching how you vote. This is murder, and they would walk away. Next person would come up for one hour of this. They came right down to the last few minutes and the chair stopped the testimony and said, we're all done now. 

Speaker 1:
Oh, wait, we have a few more. And they literally marched seven people in took cuts in front of everyone else. And those seven people stated their names and who they worked for. And they mentioned that they worked for planned parenthood and, or the a C L U. And they urged a yes vote. It was, it was the camera moment. It was the snapshot. And we watched that happen. Now I'm not gonna mention his name, but a nationally renowned, constitutional attorney spoke to me earlier this week regarding this bill, he read the bill, he's a friend of mine. I had him look at it for me because I needed guidance. Mm-hmm <affirmative> on media, uh, interviews. And he said, this is brilliantly written in vague, 

Speaker 3:
AB absolutely 

Speaker 1:
Banking on those in California, who will interpret this in the future will be corrupt enough will be dark enough to push that perinatal statement or this God forbid law that could be to the limit to the brink. 

Speaker 3:
Absolutely. 

Speaker 1:
It's if the devil's in the details, hell is in the vagueness of this bill. Mm-hmm <affirmative> 

Speaker 3:
Absolutely. There's. There's no coincidence with word usage. There's no, there was, these are attorneys that wrote this bill that, that assembly woman, she did not write this bill. She didn't even know what was in this bill. She just got on board with it and then went with it. And she was told what to say. She was told to use the two women as, as perfect examples of, of a flawed system when they are nothing. They're, they're an example of a flawed system. They're an example of a flawed system. How you can completely abuse drugs and kill your baby and not be held responsible for it. Wow. But they, they use them playing on everyone's emotion, like, well, oh my gosh. I exactly, gosh, that's that? Exactly. And so you, you, if you don't know the facts and if you don't take the time to actually read it, to see what it says, then you just believe them. And then you listen to the media right now saying, you know, they, they highlight these people saying, you know, speaking for it saying, well, these everyone's against it. They don't even know the Bill's already been amended. Mm. And what they're complaining about's been amended out. No, it 

Speaker 1:
Hasn't. No, no, 

Speaker 3:
No, no. It hasn't at all. No. And it specifically got more vague. 

Speaker 1:
That's right. That's what he made the comment about that the amendment made it more dangerous. Oh 

Speaker 3:
Yes. 

Speaker 1:
So they knew exactly what they were doing. I completely agree with you Buffy wicks from Oakland. I don't think she's got the wherewithal to, to do this. She didn't craft it, but not only, uh, do I believe that she did not craft it, but I find it. No coincidence that as you and I sit here, just breaking news yesterday or the day before is the Roe V. Wade, uh, decision possibly coming up and all this, all the, you know, stuff about this leak. Um, there's a lot of, there's a lot of talk that this type of AB 22, 23 stuff in, in blue states are quickly being crafted for fear that Roe could be overturned and that they're trying to solidify, or we would use the word codify, right. Abortion. Wouldn't it be amazing if our elected officials cared that much about the safety and the lighting and the, and the street conditions of the, of the communities that you and I live in. What if they cared that much about making sure that you and your officers had the proper ammo to defend against this rage and this age that we have, but they are, they're literally pouring everything they have into changing our culture, 

Speaker 3:
Right? It's a social agenda culture change that they are pushing onto everyone. And they're doing it quietly or in quiet because it isn't being reported. No, one's talking. No one's talking about it. 

Speaker 1:
Boy. I tell you what you raise. All of our listeners need to hear this. You, what you just said is so painfully true, that we were the first ones publicly to find out about AB 22, 23. How did that happen? Because frankly, we have spies in Sacramento. We have people who are in the political, uh, mix, both Republicans and Democrats. Okay. Who said, listen, you guys have to look into this. This is unbelievable. Well, that's how we found out. And then we started, you know, clanging and blowing every horn we could, because that's the way it's, it's going these days where, um, they're crafting all of these bills, they're doing all of these things and they're banking on the citizens, not watching, not caring. 

Speaker 3:
Oh, absolutely. Absolutely. And I I've been told that these, all of these bills being crafted, I've been told that for years, it's the a C L U that has been crafting all of these bills. Yep. And they're even getting paid for that's right. As, as fake staffers and, and everything else, but they're, their attorneys are being paid to craft these bills as they silently change are social moral fabric here. Exactly. And before long, we're gonna wake up and saying, well, when did that happen? 

Speaker 1:
So let's speculate for a second. Um, as a Christian, and as, as a student of the Bible, I, I cringe. I kind of feel like Thomas Jefferson, when he said, he said, I, uh, something to the effect. He said, I tremble when I think that, uh, the God of heaven, um, will, will someday show his justice. I tremble when I realize what my Bible says about unrighteousness and lawlessness, that it's the last indicator of a culture that is beyond the only thing that keeps me going sheriff, is that I'm still alive. You're still alive. God's still on his throne. That something good could happen. That's why I fight for what's. Right. But how do you pick up the pieces every day and get back at it? When you see, when, when at least according to CNN, you have no support. And at least how we feel in California, our elected officials, don't, don't like our law enforcement. How do you, how do you get out bed every day? How do you do this? 

Speaker 3:
You know, I think I just, I don't think about those things. I know that what my, I mean, I, I know what I believe. I know what I, I, my, my goals, my, my ambitions, I know, uh, what my role is in the position that I'm at. And I also know that, um, I didn't get here by accident. I don't believe it was, it was accidental that I got here. And if I, if I cared about the things going on around me, about California, the legislature, the, the laws that they're passing, the anti law enforcement, the pro criminal, uh, that's been going on for years, I would leave. It would be very easy for me to, to go to a, a different state that, that isn't like this all states are not like this. Yeah. Um, 

Speaker 3:
I agree. I, I, I don't think that's the right thing to do. I, I, I guess my, my job, my, my POS, my position that I, that I love dearly, I think I was born for this position for law enforcement. I believe it, um, we do the right thing. Yeah. We always do the right thing. And if, if we're looking at doing the right thing, when it comes to bills like this to laws like this, um, the right thing for me is to stand up for people that can't stand up for themselves. That's right. And who else exemplifies that more than a brand new baby that's right. That brand new baby cannot take care of itself without a mother or a father, or at least a right. A surrogate. But that is a, that is a true helpless victim that needs someone to watch out for them. And if I'm not here fighting for that baby, then nobody is 

Speaker 1:
Yep. Completely agree. What, what would you say to the individual and to the rhetoric that we're hearing today? Uh, that, um, well, you know, sheriff, it's, it's only 15 days old. Um, we're not exactly sure. Uh, about its viability, uh, as a, as a person, as though they're trying to talk you into, um, that this individual, this child has no innate rights or God given rights, but we're starting to hear these conversations now. Mm-hmm, <affirmative> where it's it? It was bad enough that it was abortion. Now it's, let's kill the baby after birth. And then now, like you said, some leading up to a year where who's gonna be the God or gods that determines that sacred moment where the pixie dust is sprinkled and you become a person. Um, it's remarkable to me because you have sworn an oath to uphold a constitution to protect the, the citizens. Is that child not a citizen? 

Speaker 3:
Absolutely. And I'm, I'm gonna try not to get emotional here that you, you want to talk about supposed to be here. And, and it wasn't, it wasn't by me that got me to this point. Um, my youngest son was born three months early and they prepared us for him to die, said he would not be able to live. He not be able to breathe. He would go on machines and more than likely he would die. Um, he came out cried when he came out, which 

Speaker 1:
Is great 

Speaker 3:
News. The, the entire, the doctors stopped doing what she was doing. The nurses, the, every, the staff, everyone, to me, it felt like an eternity. I'm sure it was a second. Everyone was staring at him because that was not supposed to happen. They were supposed to immediately go on a ventilator. Everything was supposed to start happening, but he's crying. So that means he's breathing and he wasn't supposed to be breathing. He wasn't supposed to live that's right. Was he viable? He obviously was. He had to be taken care of. And then I look at, I have two beautiful little granddaughters that are a year and a half in 16, 16 months. Are they viable? Because they can't live on their own. If, if, if, if my daughter wasn't feeding them every day, exactly. Right. They would die. If she wasn't taking care of them, if we weren't taking care of those babies, they would die. Someone has to take care of them. So is it a day? Is it three months early? There you go. Is it 27 weeks? Is it one day old? Is it 14 days old? Is it 18 days old? It's a baby. It's a living baby. 

Speaker 1:
You know, it's awesome. What you're saying, because it takes us back. And I know people are not gonna, like what I say about this, but I'm not speaking right now as a pastor. Um, before I, before I came into, um, the church and all that's gone on, since prior to that, I spent 13 years in the microbiology world working for a global, the largest company in the world, actually, for what it does. And I have to tell you straight up that if what we were about to experiment on or with was dead, we, we couldn't do the experiment. We had to find something alive and it's, it doesn't take again, it doesn't take an Einstein to figure out that sperm from a male and an egg from a female. You're not gonna have life, unless those two separate entities are living. Okay. And so it's all life people wanna talk about. 

Speaker 1:
When is it life? Excuse me. There was a point when it, when, when the life of that individual male met the life of the individual female, it started with life. It was just separate. But when it collided, there was a mathematical equation. This DNA experience that transcends any other language or, or, uh, science or math that we know of in the universe. I mean, it's easier to figure out, uh, planetary movements than it is to figure out what happened just now at that moment of conception mm-hmm <affirmative>. But the problem is when that conception takes place, when that, when that child is viewed as inconvenient, it's remarkable to see what man will go, what lengths man will go through to justify himself. 

Speaker 3:
You have to convince yourself that what you're doing is okay, is morally okay. 

Speaker 1:
And keep repeating it. Yeah. So that not only youe yourself, but you deceive others. So this, the whole thing is life. And, um, and so I love my nephew went through the very much my, my, my sister-in-law during this. Now this goes way back. But my, there was the great California helico cheese contamination, way back when, when people were being incredibly sickened by contaminated cheese, coming from Mexico, and she was pregnant and they said, you gotta abort. You have to abort. You must abort this child. My nephew was born. I have to tell you, when I saw him at St. Joseph's hospital in orange county, I thought, I honestly thought this. I, I hope he dices peacefully because ain't no way that thing's gonna live. I mean, it was the size of a Barbie doll. Mm-hmm <affirmative>. And that dude now is six foot three, and works for Warner brothers. 

Speaker 1:
There's nothing wrong with them. And yet the system I understand, but the system had been programmed say, you're goodbyes. Mm-hmm, <affirmative> get ready. Now. Maybe they do that because they see death. So often, I don't know, but you get outta bed and you fight because you're, you know, that you're on the right side. I get outta bed and I fight a different fight, cuz I know that I'm on the right side. But when you look at this thing about life, where is the logic? When is it going to come? Yeah. Where if it's living, it's worth fighting for 

Speaker 3:
Absolutely. And there is, there is no person on this planet without common that has any type of common sense and reasoning ability that can't say that a baby is alive. 

Speaker 1:
Exactly. 

Speaker 3:
And when that baby is born this back to this bill specifically, and the wording that they used that for legal in California is going to be that 28 day period. And now they've added that little addendum or the they've changed. It they've amended the bill to, to say or any pregnancy related issue, whatever it is. Well, we already know that depression is a pregnancy related issue. Correct? So at 18 days when that woman uses depression, mm-hmm <affirmative> as the reason why she threw her baby in a dumpster mm-hmm <affirmative> that's okay. Now. All 

Speaker 1:
Right. So listen, I'm gonna be very careful with what I'm gonna say. Um, trying to keep myself together on this. So it'll be a week ago tonight, where last week I was greeting people after a service and three women came up to me and they said, we're out here from Ohio and we're, we're not here, pastor Jack to come to church. This was just something that we chose to do tonight. We're out here because our two month old, uh, great grandson, grandson, nephew being represented by the three ladies that were there, um, died yesterday was, was, was killed yesterday. And I said, how did that happen? And they said, well, he was murdered. And I said, what do you mean? And they said, well, when we, uh, got word, we came immediately out here. And the, the authorities had said that the child sustained, uh, severe brain trauma. 

Speaker 1:
So they asked their relative. Did, did you drop the baby? Uh, no. Well, how'd this happen? And all of the dynamics that I don't need to tell you about transpires and the family questions don't tell me, don't ask me, leave me alone, all this kind of stuff. But CPS came out later, uh, by now it's early morning hours and said to the grandmother that it looks like from what I'm hearing, from what the physician said, they wound up doing x-rays and MRI or whatever they do even, even post death. And they said the best that they could understand at this moment is that at hi at about three weeks of age, uh, he sustained three broken ribs at three weeks of age, which is extremely hard to do because ribs are like, they're like jello. So it, it took incredible impact and damaged organs as well. 

Speaker 1:
And then some point after that, his femur was broken, his right femur was broken. And again, it's like breaking jello yet. They broke it. Someone broke it. And then finally this, this terrible head trauma mm-hmm <affirmative> and the CPS person who has got to be guarded. I understand that, but made it very clear. This was not, this was not SIDS, sudden death syndrome, none of this stuff. And so I asked them, what do you think? And they said, well, we know that, uh, that the, the biological dad, the husband, the father, he's been violent before in the past, they have a two, they have a two year old and we suspect him, but there's gonna be an investigation. And there is an investigation. And I wound up making some phone calls to just ask, is there in fact, and that they're on it. Thank God they're on it. The point is, if this would've been post 22, 23, AB 22, 23, could somebody, well, I guess the cause of death is not to be investigated. That's exactly right. If so, so this man could have inflicted this death upon this child because he's jealous, he's drunk. He's crazy. He's possessive. He's he's narcissistic. I don't know, but it happens. And, 

Speaker 3:
And where's 

Speaker 1:
The justice we're yeah, 

Speaker 3:
Please. Yes. So, and the wording of this bill is not it's it's it covers anyone. It covers other people, not just the mother. So other people is, is, is the guy going to claim that he suffered emotional distress and trauma and depression because of his wife's pregnancy. And that's what led him to abuse the baby, because it that's what that would be. The argument. It, that would be the argument in this bill and what the bill does is it prevents the coroner from doing that investigation. So you have a baby without those tests, without that investigation, those doctors would not know of those injuries. So if all of that happened right after that baby is born and that baby is just severely BU abused and beaten and killed. We're not going to know that we can't even look into it, or we subject ourselves. They were very clear to put it in there, that we're going to subject ourselves to criminal and civil penalties if we look into it. 

Speaker 3:
But everybody else around that mother, whether it's the mother or whether it's someone around her, because it says right, they're in the bill, right? They're they cannot be investigated. And if there's, and, and to be clear, and to be fair, if it is an obvious, if there are outward obvious injuries that the baby suffered a gash, a, a bullet hole, a, a stab wound that is completely different, because that is covered in there where a criminal investigator sees that and has probable cause reasonable, reasonable suspicion to detain, to arrest, to investigate. So those things will be fine, but how do you know if someone was poisoned? How do you know if someone was suffocated? How do you know if someone was just completely, a baby is just not fed for four days and just perished. And we would not know that without an actual investigation with a coroner doing an examination and finding that out. But this bill rules that all out, 

Speaker 1:
One of the <laugh> learned this from, uh, some is Israeli interrogators, but it's something that man seems to have done in the past. And that is, uh, when Israel wants to interrogate someone and not leave any marks because they're highly scrutinized Israel, can't take a step without being scrutinized. Um, you can interrogate people by shaking them. And there's, there's a Hebrew word for that leaves no marks, but it's severely can, mm-hmm, <affirmative> make life uncomfortable any way in your head, even kill you if pressed, 

Speaker 3:
Right. 

Speaker 1:
Um, how many children die like that from being shaken? And when you see the body, you can't de you can't see any external signs whatsoever. 

Speaker 3:
Yeah. You cannot. And you know, we, we recently had a, a case of this is a great example that, um, the, the mother killed the baby and we know that the mother killed the baby. And, uh, there, you know, whether, how are you gonna prove it? Are you gonna be able to arrest her? She eventually, she, shortly after she killed herself. So that investigation is all gone, but that's a, that you want to talk about them using these, these obscure, false examples of why we need this bill. That aren't really those two women that they're naming this bill after that's right. They, they, those babies died because they ingested too much methamphetamine. Right. They were poisoned, right. They were murdered. That's right. We will not know any of that. If this bill passes, because it's preventing us from doing that investigation from doing that, that research into why that baby died. Yeah. And it's, it, it, it would be very easy if they didn't want this, those two women to be put in jail for their babies being stillborn, then they could have just wrote it into the law that said, if you're going to completely abuse drugs and overdose your baby, you're not gonna be held responsible for it because that's what happened. 

Speaker 1:
That's what exactly 

Speaker 3:
She, they're playing on your emotions as a person that doesn't know that background that, oh my gosh, that' poor, innocent woman suffered a stillborn death, which is, is horrific in and of itself. And, and sometimes those do happen. And now they're going to be victimized again, by being put in jail and prosecuted that isn't what happened in these two women's cases. Yep. And it's, it's very unfortunate that our politicians just flat out lie to us. Right. And the media repeats. It puts their own little spin on it to make it even better and more emotionally involved. And then you get the masses just buying into it without doing their own research. And we're gonna be stuck with this. If this passes, we will eventually be talking about these babies that are dying. Mm-hmm <affirmative> and that's right. We don't know why they're dying. Why is the infant death rate in California of month old babies? Why did it just skyrocket through the roof? Well, it's because now they're, they're legally allowed to kill their babies. If they don't want them, they can that's right up to 28 days. 

Speaker 1:
That's right. So wrapping this up, what does, what needs to happen in California? 

Speaker 3:
Certainly this bill has to either be severely amended or gutted or voted down. And if they believe that the, that there is something wrong, they can amend the laws that are currently on the books, uh, that are legitimate and that are with common sense, real logical steps to take care of it. Um, what I hope is I hope, you know, we talk about something going viral and everything else, maybe it's this podcast. That's right. Maybe at least in California, uh, we they've already shown our media has shown that they're not going to report it. They're not gonna tell everyone that they're trying to pass this. Um, they want you to believe that it's been amended and it's all fine. And the people that are against it are just crazy. Whackjob right. Wing. Yep. You know, just the, you know, the, the Republicans, the horrible Republicans, uh, when in reality, this, this is going to be horrible in a law enforcement world. 

Speaker 3:
This is another perfect example of our current legislature. That is just complete anti-public safety. They are for, for everyone's freedom. Do ever what you want at the consequence of zero. Yeah. Um, doesn't it matter if it affects anyone else? It doesn't matter if someone else dies. If a baby dies, uh, you can sell fentanyl all you want. It doesn't matter how many people you kill. Yeah. There's no consequences for it. Uh, it, this is just another, another thing in that line that shows that, that our legislature, especially our committees, our public safety committee, our health committee has absolutely nothing to do with health or public safety. It's about an, an imoral agenda that taking away consequence for criminal behavior. 

Speaker 1:
So, uh, what if every sheriff in this state has a chance to hear you right now, and, and you had a moment to say something to every sheriff in the state of California. 

Speaker 3:
You know, we, we have an association. I hope, I hope the association as a whole. Uh, I hope we, I hope we take a, a hard position on this and, and are very vocal about it because it affects us. It affects the way we conduct business. It affects our coroner's bureaus. It affects, uh, our investigators that are dealing with baby deaths. And I hope they're, I hope they're, I, I wish everyone would be as vocal as me and I wish everyone would, would, would not be afraid to speak out because of a political consequence do the right thing. Oh yeah. If you, if you suffer a political consequence, that's, that's far less than some other consequence you're gonna suffer for doing the wrong thing. Yeah. And I, I hope as a whole, uh, we, we stand up, I know there are other sheriffs that are, that are taking a stance. Like I am, uh, a vocal stance. I hope that we all do as a whole. And I hope all law enforcement, even our chiefs of police associations and everything else, I hope they, I hope they're willing to do it too, because this is, this isn't about abortion anymore. This isn't about if it was about abortion, we wouldn't have this obscure wording and specific words that they're using. Um, they're, they've, they've made it into something else and it's a, it's a serious threat to, to every baby that is born. 

Speaker 1:
Wow. Can you direct people to a podcast? You have a podcast don't you 

Speaker 3:
<laugh>? I do have a podcast. Uh, it's called the RSO Roundup. And really it's a it's, it's, it's basically my way of, of letting people into the department, learning who we are, what we do, uh, how we interact with them. Uh, I have, I usually have a, a guest on every day. I, while I, I, I can't even say that I have a guest on every time I have yet to do one by myself. Uh it's. It is just a good way for us to interact and for them to get to know us. Yeah. We've had to do repeat shows because there was too many questions, uh, that we didn't answer during them. So it's starting to, it's starting to 

Speaker 1:
Take off how many people find it. What's, 

Speaker 3:
Uh, we ha on any platform you want that has any type of podcast it's under RSO, Roundup, 

Speaker 1:
RSO, Roundup. It's awesome. Listen, on behalf of, um, a very thankful, uh, state and Southern California, I know that you are a rockstar in your county of Riverside. And, um, again, if there's anything that we can do at any time, um, I would say this, I would say, if anyone wanna make sure I get my math, correct. If anyone in Riverside county is going to turn 18 before a voting day, they can register to vote. We want everyone in Riverside county to register, to vote and to get your, um, to get your voice out there, to protect life and Liberty and freedom. We need to keep this sheriff employed and doing the right thing. Well, 

Speaker 3:
Thank you. I agree with that wholeheartedly 

Speaker 1:
<laugh> yeah. Well, I'm glad you do. It's an honor to be with you today 

Speaker 3:
And pastor Jack so proud. I appreciate being here. Thank you. Thank 

Speaker 1:
You. 

Speaker 2:
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